LENS

June 2, 2010

Death In New Orleans – May 29th_31st, 2010

Filed under: Uncategorized — wally426 @ 11:14 pm

KATRINA

Even though it is coming up on five years this August, her ghost was everywhere. It lingered in the most unlikely places, glaring at you like a black hole amidst the colorful city verandas. Even on the most decadent blocks, there was a sense of the wrath she brought upon this magnificent city.

.

.

On Royal Street, one of the French Quarter’s finest, nearly 20% of the shops were still abandoned. You would look into the windows and see a small layer of caked mud covering the floor.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

Into the light

.

.

Despite the repairs, signs of the looting that took place were still visible

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

St Bernard Parish

Nearly 80% of this Parish was five feet underwater after the levees broke. Five years later, it still looked like a war zone. Most of the houses were still boarded up or burnt out, it was a breathtaking sight. As I was venturing into the area on foot, I had to go around 7AM when it wasn’t dark and most people were (hopefully) sleeping. The silence was almost too much to bear…

.

.

.

.

.

.

1,464 people lost their lives in Louisiana alone as a result of Katrina. Many weren’t found until months after the storm as they tried to escape their rapidly flooding homes through air ducts and attics. Most people can remember the “X Marks The Spot” graffiti which told the date a house was inspected, who inspected it, what sector of the city the house was located and how many bodies were inside. The graffiti indicated someone died in this house, but I couldn’t bring myself to go inside.

.

.

There were stray cats everywhere. During a morning run through the Parish, I was greeted by a cat doing it’s business in the middle of the street. He didn’t flinch as I ran past him, just kept staring straight ahead as if nothing was happening.

.

.

.

.

.

.

The only businesses I saw that were still open were bars and bodegas. Everything else was boarded up.

.

.

.

.

.

.

Vines had overtaken most of the dwellings at some point, but the ones which had gone inside couldn’t manage to survive.

.

.

One of the only people I saw that morning was a prostitute. She began her long approach, but I carried on towards the main drag.

FIREMEN’S CEMETERY

The cemetery was founded by the Firemen’s benevolent association in 1852. All of the graves in New Orleans are above ground as most of the city is at/below sea level. Years of storms and neglect had taken a toll on the graves, but the quiet solitude which flowed between the monuments was oddly calming

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

On all of the graves, it noted where they originally came from. There were people from all over the states and Europe who settled here, it was very interesting to see.

.

.

.

.

.

.

Damaged during Katrina

.

.

.

.

Thomas L. Leeds began a wood manufacturing plant in New Orleans back in 1825 and was a big manufacturer of field rifles for the confederacy. While the elder Leeds never got to see his business boom during the war, his son Charles took the helm after his passing, managing the business while serving as New Orleans’ mayor until his death in 1898.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

Game Over…

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

Advertisements

1 Comment »

  1. It’s hard to believe that I was in N.O. with you. You have the ability to see things with such a beautiful and sensitive eye. Thank you for making the trip to this unique city so much more memorable and thank you for allowing us to experience the N.O. culture with you. Love you, Ma

    Comment by Mom — June 4, 2010 @ 9:35 pm


RSS feed for comments on this post. TrackBack URI

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

Blog at WordPress.com.

%d bloggers like this: